Keynote for Athens Cloud Computing conference

I am proud to be the keynote speaker at the Athens Cloud Computing conference on the 10th of March.

I will be kicking off the event with a challenge to see cloud not as the transfer of computing from within the enterprise to an external party, but instead as a chance to reconsider the boundary of the enterprise, and try to create new business opportunity by partnership through cloud computing.

Cloud Computing conference.

Drugs enter the digital age – Details of a research project I’m part of…

A team of us at the LSE have just won £700k to look at the complex digital processes and infrastructures surrounding future medicine delivery. The following is taken from the press release (link below).

The world’s health sector has gone digital, with electronic prescriptions, digitised supply chains and personalised medicine the new buzz words.

Earlier this year, the US biotech company Proteus announced that it had raised US$172 million for its pioneering tablets containing embedded microchips. These swallowable devices collect and report biometric data and can tell if a patient has taken their medication correctly.

In a similar breakthrough, Google has recently announced a prototype contact lens which measures glucose in a user’s tears and communicates this information to a mobile phone so that patients can better manage their medication.

Both innovations illustrate the hybrid devices that medicines have now become – and highlight the cumbersome and mostly paper-based current systems that are still being used to deliver medicines.

Dr Tony Cornford from LSE’s Department of Management hopes to make some headway in this area by spending the next two years exploring digital innovations in how drugs are supplied and used.

A £700,000 grant from Research Councils UK will allow Dr Cornford and a team of co-investigators from LSE, the University of Leeds, UCL, Brunel and the Health Foundation to map emerging new fields, such as electronic prescribing systems, intelligent medicines supply chains, new diagnostic and monitoring procedures, and personalised medicines based on individual genomic profiles.”

 Read the full article at: Drugs enter the digital age – Health – Research highlights – Research and expertise – Home.

Cloud sourcing and innovation: slow train coming? FREE JOURNAL ARTICLE

An article I wrote with Edgar Whitley and Leslie Willcocks for the journal Strategic Outsourcing has been awarded the “Outstanding paper of 2014” award. This means that the article is freely available from the following website (articles are usually $32 so quite a saving!). Please feel free to download a copy today:

Emerald Insight | Cloud sourcing and innovation: slow train coming?: A composite research study.

Abstract:

Purpose – Although cloud computing has been heralded as driving the innovation agenda, there is growing evidence that cloud computing is actually a “slow train coming”. The purpose of this paper is to seek to understand the factors that drive and inhibit the adoption of cloud computing, particularly in relation to its use for innovative practices.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on a composite research base including two detailed surveys and interviews with 56 participants in the cloud supply chain undertaken between 2010 and 2013. The insights from this data are presented in relation to set of antecedents to innovation and a cloud sourcing model of collaborative innovation.

Findings – The paper finds that while some features of cloud computing will hasten the adoption of cloud, and its use for innovative purposes by the enterprise, there are also clear challenges that need to be addressed before cloud can be adopted successfully. Interestingly, the analysis highlights that many of these challenges arise from the technological nature of cloud computing itself.

Research limitations/implications – The research highlights a series of factors that need to be better understood for the maximum benefit from cloud computing to be achieved. Further research is needed to assess the best responses to these challenges.

Practical implications – The research suggests that enterprises need to undertake a number of steps for the full benefits of cloud computing to be achieved. It suggests that collaborative innovation is not necessarily an immediate consequence of adopting cloud computing.

Originality/value – The paper draws on an extensive research base to provide empirically informed analysis of the complexities of adopting cloud computing for innovation.

 

I’m presenting at “The Exchange 2013 – Knowledge Peers”

TheExchange_NOVEMBER

I’m excited to be presenting at “The Exchange 2013 – Knowledge Peers” on the 28th November. Not only is it at the Kia Oval (which I drive past regularly so am looking forward to getting the tour inside), but also because their focus is on networking with smaller and medium sized organisations. I am of the opinion that cloud computing will offer more valuable and exciting opportunities for SMEs than large organisations so I am looking forward to connecting with many more small organisations at the event.

I hope you can join me there!

Will.

Latest article published: Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal | Cloud Sourcing and Innovation: Slow Train Coming? A Composite Research Study

The latest article from our long-running Cloud Computing research stream has just been published…

Leslie Willcocks, Will Venters, Edgar A. Whitley, (2013) “ Cloud Sourcing and Innovation: Slow Train Coming? A Composite Research Study“, Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, Vol. 6 Iss: 2

ABSTRACT:

Purpose – Although cloud computing has been heralded as driving the innovation agenda, there is growing evidence that cloud is actually a “slow train coming”. The purpose of this paper is to seek to understand the factors that drive and inhibit the adoption of cloud particularly in relation to its use for innovative practices.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on a composite research base including two detailed surveys and interviews with 56 participants in the cloud supply chain undertaken between 2010 and 2013. The insights from this data are presented in relation to set of antecedents to innovation and a cloud sourcing model of collaborative innovation.

Findings – The paper finds that while some features of cloud computing will hasten the adoption of cloud and its use for innovative purposes by the enterprise, there are also clear challenges that need to be addressed before cloud can be successfully adopted. Interestingly, our analysis highlights that many of these challenges arise from the technological nature of cloud computing itself.

Research limitations/implications – The research highlights a series of factors that need to be better understood for the maximum benefit from cloud computing to be achieved. Further research is needed to assess the best responses to these challenges.

Practical implications – The research suggests that enterprises need to undertake a number of steps for the full benefits of cloud computing to be achieved. It suggests that collaborative innovation is not necessarily an immediate consequence of adopting cloud computing.

Originality/value – The paper draws on an extensive research base to provide empirically informed analysis of the complexities of adopting cloud computing for innovation.

Say goodbye to the IT department

Dell have produced a dongle which plugs into monitors HDMI port and connects to Bluetooth peripherals (keyboard/mouse..) and WiFi  While it is a basic Android machine, its value is in automatically providing a virtualized PC environment from Dell’s Wyse data-centre.

Imagine dispensing with all the PCs in an office and simply having monitors with a dongle attached and leaving the PC maintenance to Dell in the cloud.

Dell Wyse Project Ophelia thin client unveiled at CES 2013 | Cloud Pro

Obviously some will argue this is a greener option (yes if the Dell Cloud is multiplexing to provide the virtualized environments and using efficient machines); an easier option (not necessarily- since you are adding another layer of hardware in the mix – though you are outsourcing PC desktop maintenance to Dell); a cheaper option (who knows – that will very much depend on the service charges going forward – PCs aren’t exactly expensive these days in hardware terms – only in software and maintenance terms).

Dell Wyse Project Ophelia thin client unveiled at CES 2013 | Cloud Pro.

ITOe – Speakers – Nordic Innovation & Agility

I’ll be talking about cloud computing and outsourcing at the Nordic Innovation and Agility forum  in Stockholm in April…

ITOe – Speakers – Nordic Innovation & Agility.

The title of my talk will be “The business of cloud computing – innovation and agility” with my focus on the way cloud computing can support innovation and drive agility in businesses. Along the way I will (probably) discuss cloud computing and the Large Hadron Collider, Smart-cities and Big-data – exploring how high capacity and agile computing can support agile business practices and innovation.

I hope you can make it!